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Date

Exterior shot of building, sepia-toned image. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building with Emerson College banners. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Cover of course catalog from 1934. An imprint of the college seal/logo appears in gold on a textured paper surface. The seal contains an image of a lion raising an axe and includes a banner with the Latin text, "Deus Protector Noster." Beneath the logo, simple text in art deco-era typeface reads, "Emerson College. Boston, Mass. 1934." In 1934, the name of the institution was shortened from Emerson College of Oratory to Emerson College.

1934

180 Tremont Street, an art deco style high-rise building, rising behind pink and white flowering trees on the edge of Boston Common. 180 Tremont was purchased by Emerson College in 1992 during John Zacharis presidency, laying the groundwork for Emerson's move from Boston's Back Bay to the Theatre District. Six years later, it was renamed the Ansin Building in honor of Sydney and Sophie Ansin, the parents of Edmund Ansin, who donated $1 million to the college. The Ansin building is home to Emerson's Visual & Media Arts (VMA) labs and facilities, offices for VMA and Writing, Literature & Publishing (WLP) departments, and WERS, WECB, and ETIN. It also contains the Tufte and 3D computer labs, Digital Production labs, and the Media Services center.

1992 - 2001

Two stacked photos of The Paramount Theatre's main house, before and after renovation. The land on which the Paramount stands has a history of earlier performance spaces dating back to 1836. Former spaces include the Melodeon, Gaiety, and Bijou. The Paramount Theatre first opened its doors on February 25, 1932 as one of the premiere art deco movie palaces built by Paramount Studios, but it closed in 1976 and fell into disrepair. Emerson purchased the building in 2005. Architects from the firm Elkus Manfredi worked with Evergreene Architectural Arts to replicate the paint and decorative motifs throughout the theatre and restore it to its original appearance. Emerson College reopened the Paramount Theatre to the public in March 2010. Today, the Paramount Center includes the adjoining "arcade" building providing theater space, film screening room, rehearsal rooms, classrooms, and a dormitory. Info sources: Boston Globe (3/3/2010); ArtsEmerson.org; Emerson.edu (Paramount Mainstage).

2000 - 2015

Exterior view of 6 Arlington St. (0 Marlborough St.), shot from Public Garden with a food truck parked out front. Constructed in 1930, Zero Marlborough is an historic art deco building that served as a dormitory and dining hall for Emerson College from 1988 to 2006. It also contained large dance hall.

1988

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