search archive
explore archive

2726 total results

In complete archive


Title
Description
Date

Exterior shot of building, sepia-toned image. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building with Emerson College banners. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

Architect's rendering of 180 Tremont Street by Elkus/Manfredi, showing the potential usage of the building for students, staff, faculty, and administrators. The illustration includes the basement level, surrounding buildings and the Boylston MBTA station. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior view of the brownstone Ames Mansion. On the left, we see people on the sidewalk and a Coca Cola truck on the street. Unidentified woman in lower left corner of photo may be Carol Ann Small, secretary in the Alumni Office. Emerson College occupied this property between 1984 and 1995. The Oliver Ames Mansion at 355 Comm. Ave. was designed by architect Carl Fehmer and built in 1882-1883 for Oliver Ames and his wife Anna Coffin Ames. It was the first of the Boston chateaux, large houses inspired by 16th century chateaux of the Loire Valley. Oliver Ames, an investor in railroads, banks and manufacturing companies, would become Governor of Massachusetts in 1886-1887 while living at this address. The building remained in the Ames family until 1926 when it was purchased and converted into a showroom for the National Casket Company. It was later used for office and retail space.

1986-10

Exterior view of the brownstone Ames Mansion. Emerson College occupied this property between 1984 and 1995. The Oliver Ames Mansion at 355 Comm. Ave. was designed by architect Carl Fehmer and built in 1882-1883 for Oliver Ames and his wife Anna Coffin Ames. It was the first of the Boston chateaux, large houses inspired by 16th century chateaux of the Loire Valley. Oliver Ames, an investor in railroads, banks and manufacturing companies, would become Governor of Massachusetts in 1886-1887 while living at this address. The building remained in the Ames family until 1926 when it was purchased and converted into a showroom for the National Casket Company. It was later used for office and retail space.

1986

Architect's rendering of 180 Tremont Street by Elkus/Manfredi, showing the potential usage of the building for students, staff, faculty, and administrators. The illustration includes the basement level, surrounding buildings and the Boylston MBTA station. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992

Front facade of 216 Tremont Street, Boston. The inscription above the entrance reads: "Union Savings Bank Building" with the dates 1865 and 1927. Purple and gold Emerson College banners hang near the middle floors. The former Union Bank building at 216 Tremont Street is a multipurpose building that houses: the Bill Bordy Theater and Auditorium on the ground floor, used for lectures, performances, performance classes and special events; the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, its clinic for Deaf and Hard of Hearing children, and the Communication Sciences and Disorders Lab (CSD); the offices of the Registrar, Student Financial Services, Health Services, Career Services, the Counseling Center and the International Student Center.

1997

Powered by Preservica
Copyright 2016 © Emerson College