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Title
Description
Date

Arthur Edes behind the podium looking at his watch; Three students stand at the microphone; Remaining students are seated. Arthur Edes was founder of the broadcasting department at Emerson College.

1934-05-01 - 1934-08-31

Emerson students perform a full-scale radio play, complete with sound effects.

1949

Students perform a radio play at WERS-FM studios, Emerson College.

1950 - 1959

A view through the window from inside control room. Two men are in the control room and four are in the live room. Motorola equipment and a grand piano are pictured. Photo imprint reads: "c1955, Arber-French & Co., Boston, Mass." WERS-TV presented the station's first closed circuit television (CCTV) program in 1955.

1955

Young man in a construction helmet leans through a hole in a wall. A sticker on the wall reads, "WERS 88.9," and handwritten above that is, "The New Home of." in the Ansin building. In 1998, WERS relocated from 180 Beacon Street to the Ansin building at 180 Tremont St, where it remains today (2019). It would be the first Emerson building project completely funded by gifts. At the time, WERS was Boston's only radio station with street-level windowed studios.

1998

Artist's sketch of WERS on air studio and live performance studio with musicians and engineers. Elkus / Manfredu Architects Ltd.

A television monitor, labelled "Mon #17," shows the image of several men in chairs with their backs to camera and four men standing. One of them is looking at his wristwatch. An image from the summer of 1934 is displayed a television monitor during a Sept. 30, 1986 event celebrating the history of broadcasting at Emerson College.

1986-09-30

Empty studio at WERS shot across a table holding a table mic and globe.

1958

Two "United Press" teletype machines deliver newswire to WERS. On the wall, a sign reads "The World Today." Above the sign, four clocks displaying the time in Boston, London, Moscow and Tokyo.

1958

Two "United Press" teletype machines deliver newswire to WERS. On the wall, a sign reads "The World Today." Above the sign, four clocks displaying the time in Boston, London, Moscow and Tokyo.

1958

Man sits at a desk with a turntable in front and another behind him. He holds something with a cord to one ear. The vinyl record, Jazz for Dancers, sits on the desk.

1958

Young man in a construction helmet leans through a hole in a wall. A sticker on the wall reads, "WERS 88.9," and handwritten above that is, "The New Home of." In 1998, WERS relocated from 180 Beacon Street to the Ansin building at 180 Tremont St., where it remains today (2015). It would be the first Emerson building project completely funded by gifts. At the time, WERS was Boston's only radio station with street-level windowed studios.

1998

Ms. Hunt, wearing headphones, operates a photograph turntable in the WERS radio studio.

1959

Ms. Hunt receives checks the latest newswire from the teletype machine at WERS radio.

1959

Ms. Hunt sits at a desk with clipboard in hand, in front of a microphone with acoustic tiling on the wall behind her.

1959

Ms. Hunt, standing, reads copy into WERS microphone.

1959

Ms. Hunt sits at a desk with clipboard in hand, speaking into a microphone.

1959

1986-04

Globe on desk next to audio equipment and microphone.

1958

Two smartly-dressed young men in a room before a large glass window. One sits at a small table. He appears to be reading copy into a single tabletop microphone. The other sits behind a larger desk built around audio equipment. He's got two turntables and a microphone. Two turntables and a microphone. In 1949, the Broadcasting Division received FCC approval for an educational broadcasting license; Emerson’s student-operated radio station WERS went on the air for the first time with 10 watts power.

1949

Ms. Hunt selects a Flamenco record from a wall of vinyl LPs.

1959

Fleming and Edes, both seated, in conversation. A display board sits on a table behind them. Bob Fleming later served as Executive Director of the library at Emerson College.

1986-09-30

180 Tremont Street, an art deco style high-rise building, rising behind pink and white flowering trees on the edge of Boston Common. 180 Tremont was purchased by Emerson College in 1992 during John Zacharis presidency, laying the groundwork for Emerson's move from Boston's Back Bay to the Theatre District. Six years later, it was renamed the Ansin Building in honor of Sydney and Sophie Ansin, the parents of Edmund Ansin, who donated $1 million to the college. The Ansin building is home to Emerson's Visual & Media Arts (VMA) labs and facilities, offices for VMA and Writing, Literature & Publishing (WLP) departments, and WERS, WECB, and ETIN. It also contains the Tufte and 3D computer labs, Digital Production labs, and the Media Services center.

1992 - 2001

Seated, Dorothy Morris; standing, left to right, Belle Sylvester and Ruth Campbell. Under the leadership of Dean Harry S. Ross, the first Emerson course in radio broadcasting was offered by Arthur F. Edes, program director at WEEI, Boston (1932). Info source: www.emerson.edu (Iwasaki library: A short history of Emerson College).

1930 - 1949

Ms. Hunt at the broadcast audio console at WERS, holding a clipboard. Percy Faith's LP, My Fair Lady sits on the desk.

1959

Ms. Hunt at the broadcast audio console at WERS, holding a clipboard. Percy Faith's LP, My Fair Lady sits on the desk.

1959

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