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Title
Description
Date

Interior shot with bench chairs, reception desk and purple wall with white lettering reading "Emerson". Elkus / Manfredu Architects Ltd.

Interior shot. Top of open staircase with ornate skylight above white columns. Emerson College Library was located here. Date unknown. Before Aug. 1985.

1985

Exterior photo of several buildings. 130 Beacon St. was the heart of college activity for many decades. The building was owned by Emerson College from 1933 through 2003.

1988-11-10

Exterior of the building. An Emerson College banner hands above the entrance. This area was known by the Emerson community as "The Wall." 130 Beacon St. was the heart of college activity for many decades. The building was owned by Emerson College from 1933 through 2003.

1990 - 2003

Interior shot. Top of open staircase with ornate skylight above white columns. Emerson College Library was located here. Date unknown. Before Aug. 1985.

1985

Building exterior. 130 Beacon St. was the heart of college activity for many decades. The building was owned by Emerson College from 1933 through 2003.

1993-10-05

Exterior of building in Boston's Back Bay neighborhood. Emerson College Library was located here.

1984 circa

Exterior of building. Owned by Emerson College 1960-1997.

1993-06-29

Exterior of building. A large banner promotes the 1990 EVVY awards. Shot from 143 Beacon St.

1990-04-12

Exterior view, wintertime. Emerson College owned 21 Commonwealth from Sept 24, 1984 through March 4, 2002.

1991?

Interior room with fireplace. The newly renovated Helen Rose room on the first floor of 21 Commonwealth Ave. in the Communication Studies Building.

1991-06-14

Classroom with long tables and chairs all facing forward. Television at front of room. Elkus / Manfredu Architects Ltd.

Aerial view of the castle and grounds.

1988

Exterior view, wintertime. 21 Commonwealth Ave. housed Communication Studies at Emerson College.

1991?

Exterior view of 6 Arlington St. (0 Marlborough St.), shot from Public Garden with a food truck parked out front. Constructed in 1930, and purchased by Emerson College from the Katherine Gibbs School, Zero Marlborough Street is an historic art deco building that served as a dormitory and dining hall for Emerson College from 1988 to 2006. It also contained large dance hall.

1988-02-01

Exterior view, wintertime. 21 Commonwealth Ave. housed Communication Studies at Emerson College.

1991?

Exterior view, wintertime. 21 Commonwealth Ave. housed Communication Studies at Emerson College.

1991?

Exterior view of the castle.

1988

Exterior view of the Castle.

1980 - 1999

Exterior view of the castle. Emerson College's European Center.

1980 - 2019

Students sitting on a low wall in front of a building. One students, with a backpack slung over one shoulder stands with his/her back to the camera.

1986-04

Students sitting on the steps outside 130 Beacon Street, shot from the east side. (There is no food truck pictured).

1986-04

Four students sit on the front steps.

1986-04

Students on the steps outside 130 Beacon Street, some sitting and others standing. Shot from the west side. (There is no food truck pictured).

1986-04

Little Building exterior from the east side along Tremont Street. 80 Boylston St., Boston, MA. The building was designed by Clarence Blackall and commissioned by John Mason Little in 1917.

1994-02-01

Photo of the buildings with people on the sidewalk and a car on the street. In 1964, the College purchased 132-134 Beacon Street for use as a dormitory.

1967

In 1985, Emerson opened its European Center, based out of Kasteel Well in the Netherlands. The first group of students arrived in September. "The castle," as it is common called among the Emerson community, remains a popular option for study abroad.

1986

Computer generated architect's rendering of a modernist building with the caption: Eastbound on Sunset Boulevard, Emerson College Los Angeles. In 2008, Emerson purchased property in Los Angeles and selected architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects to build the Los Angeles Center which would become the administrative center of the LA campus.

2008

Exterior view of 534 Beacon Street, a modern limestone and red brick apartment building. In 1972, the college leased, and later purchased 534 Beacon Street for use as the Fensgate Dormitory. Hotel Fensgate was built in 1923-1924. The 72-room apartment house had a restaurant downstairs famous for its steak and lobster menu. Hotel Fensgate also gave an early start to the career of legendary music entrepreneur George Wein. Wein started a music series, La Jazz Doux at the Satire Room, before gaining fame with his Storyville nightclub and record label, and founding the music festivals at Newport (Newport Jazz and Newport Folk). During the late 1930s and 1940s, it also featured a small nightclub, the Satire Room (later renamed Cafe Society). In 1952, the club hosted the first Beaux Arts Ball, the highlight of the gay social season. The hotel manager disapproved of his lobby full of men dressed in chiffon and ladies in tuxedos, so the ball found another venue. The building would be used a dormitory and dining hall for Chandler School of Women (1961-1973), and briefly used for the same purpose by Boston University, before Emerson College moved-in. In 1982, an early incarnation of the ProArts Consortium was housed in the Emerson dormitory at Fensgate. The inter-arts residency program, then called Art House, consisted of a director and 50 students from the BAC, MassArt, the SMFA, and Emerson College. Emerson continued to operate Fensgate Dormitory until the mid-1990s.

1974

Computer generated architect's rendering of a modernist building. In the foreground, a red car races past on the street. In 2008, Emerson purchased property in Los Angeles and selected architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis Architects to build the Los Angeles Center which would become the administrative center of the LA campus.

2008

Exterior shot of building, sepia-toned image. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

Exterior shot of building with Emerson College banners. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

Architect's rendering of 180 Tremont Street by Elkus/Manfredi, showing the potential usage of the building for students, staff, faculty, and administrators. The illustration includes the basement level, surrounding buildings and the Boylston MBTA station. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992

Exterior shot of building. Architects, Elkus/Manfredi. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992-06-19

A man walks through the arcade and under the interior vaulted ceiling on the first floor of the Little Building. 80 Boylston St., Boston, MA. The building was designed by Clarence Blackall and commissioned by John Mason Little in 1917.

1994-11-03

A yellow newspaper article titled, This fall we open our new home on the Charles River. There is a large drawing of the building in the middle of the paper, and at the bottom are the words Beacon and Berkeley Streets Boston. In 1933, the Emerson College of Oratory purchased 130 Beacon Street to house administration and classrooms. It is the first building purchased for what will become the Back Bay campus. This would also become the heart of the Back Bay campus, with the Emerson community gathering in front of the building, dubbing the area as “The Wall.”.

1933

Exterior view of the brownstone Ames Mansion. Emerson College occupied this property between 1984 and 1995. The Oliver Ames Mansion at 355 Comm. Ave. was designed by architect Carl Fehmer and built in 1882-1883 for Oliver Ames and his wife Anna Coffin Ames. It was the first of the Boston chateaux, large houses inspired by 16th century chateaux of the Loire Valley. Oliver Ames, an investor in railroads, banks and manufacturing companies, would become Governor of Massachusetts in 1886-1887 while living at this address. The building remained in the Ames family until 1926 when it was purchased and converted into a showroom for the National Casket Company. It was later used for office and retail space.

1986

Exterior view of 6 Arlington St. (0 Marlborough St.), shot from Public Garden with a food truck parked out front. Constructed in 1930, Zero Marlborough is an historic art deco building that served as a dormitory and dining hall for Emerson College from 1988 to 2006. It also contained large dance hall.

1988

Exterior view of the brownstone Ames Mansion. On the left, we see people on the sidewalk and a Coca Cola truck on the street. Unidentified woman in lower left corner of photo may be Carol Ann Small, secretary in the Alumni Office. Emerson College occupied this property between 1984 and 1995. The Oliver Ames Mansion at 355 Comm. Ave. was designed by architect Carl Fehmer and built in 1882-1883 for Oliver Ames and his wife Anna Coffin Ames. It was the first of the Boston chateaux, large houses inspired by 16th century chateaux of the Loire Valley. Oliver Ames, an investor in railroads, banks and manufacturing companies, would become Governor of Massachusetts in 1886-1887 while living at this address. The building remained in the Ames family until 1926 when it was purchased and converted into a showroom for the National Casket Company. It was later used for office and retail space.

1986-10

Student on the front steps of 130 Beacon. Property signage displays the new name, "Emerson College, established 1880," as well as directional signage pointing the way to "FM station WERS" and "Drama workshop in rear." Originally built as private residences, 130 Beacon was part of a group of Back Bay buildings held by Emerson College. The college purchased 130 Beacon in 1933 to house administrative offices and classrooms. It became the flagship building of Emerson's Back Bay campus and over the years would also served as the base for The Emerson Review, The Berkeley Beacon and EIV, as well as the college library and a television studio. President Ross created the college's first theater in the Carriage House, located behind 128 and 130 Beacon. In 1939, the name of the institution was shortened from Emerson College of Oratory to Emerson College to coincide with expanded course offerings. 130 Beacon was a popular student hangout known as the Wall. Upon learning that Emerson was selling all of the college’s west side properties and relocating to complete the vision of the "Campus on the Common," Emerson students, staff, and faculty lamented the loss of the Beacon Street buildings for their character which lent itself to a unique sense of community. "I guess if you ask anyone from Emerson from the Beacon Street era, they would say The Wall was one of the best things about Emerson. It was like our Facebook. Behind The Wall was a huge sheet stretched between posts. All the events and news were posted daily. It was the central gathering point for campus life." - Barbara Ruthberg, BS '68. Info sources: Berkeley Beacon (10/19/2005); Emerson.edu webpages: Past-presidents, Editorial style guide, Memories of the Library; online video: "Pete Chvany reminisces at the wall.”.

1950 - 1959

Architect's rendering of 180 Tremont Street by Elkus/Manfredi, showing the potential usage of the building for students, staff, faculty, and administrators. The illustration includes the basement level, surrounding buildings and the Boylston MBTA station. In the early 1990s, Emerson President John Zacharis began the transition that would relocate Emerson College from the Back Bay to the Theater District. The Board of Trustees approved the purchase of 180 Tremont Street to house classrooms and administrative offices. Now known as the Ansin building, 180 Tremont would become the flagship building of the Campus on the Common.

1992

180 Tremont Street, an art deco style high-rise building, rising behind pink and white flowering trees on the edge of Boston Common. 180 Tremont was purchased by Emerson College in 1992 during John Zacharis presidency, laying the groundwork for Emerson's move from Boston's Back Bay to the Theatre District. Six years later, it was renamed the Ansin Building in honor of Sydney and Sophie Ansin, the parents of Edmund Ansin, who donated $1 million to the college. The Ansin building is home to Emerson's Visual & Media Arts (VMA) labs and facilities, offices for VMA and Writing, Literature & Publishing (WLP) departments, and WERS, WECB, and ETIN. It also contains the Tufte and 3D computer labs, Digital Production labs, and the Media Services center.

1992 - 2001

Architect's rendering of the 2-story Chickering Hall building with the caption, Our New Home. The first floor is defined by a series of five arches. The drawing includes a horse-drawn carriage on the street. In 1901, the College moved to Chickering Hall, 239 Huntington Ave, where it would stay for only ten years. The Emerson community welcomed the move to this Back Bay location near Symphony Hall. The decision to relocate from the College’s previous address was due in large part to safety concerns. Emerson’s Odd Fellows Hall in the South End was troubled with high rates of crime. From A Century of Eloquence: “The college rented the entire second floor of Chickering Hall which provided nine spacious, well lighted and ventilated classrooms, two of which were small lecture halls (40x22ft), each complete with a platform. After 1903, a portrait of Dr. Emerson, presented by the graduating class of that year, hung in the corridor. Six marble stairways with wrought-iron balustrades led to the second floor. The first floor held the library and the school’s administrative offices, and morning lectures were held in the “superb hall on the first floor, which seated 800.” During this period, Boston caterer D. M. Shooshan’s Ladies and Gent’s Cafe also occupied space on the first floor of Chickering Hall at the address 241-243. An ad in the Emerson College Magazine [Vol. 19] described it as a “First-class restaurant, also a choice line of confectionery. Ice cream and fancy baking of all kinds.” Chickering Hall was owned by piano manufacturing company, Chickering & Sons. It was designed by architectural firm Peabody & Stearns for use as an 800-seat concert venue. After Emerson’s departure the hall was expanded and re-opened in 1912 as the 1,600-seat vaudeville and film venue named St. James Theatre, operated by Marcus. In the 1920s, it become a popular stock company stage, and in the 1930s it was renamed the Uptown Theatre, operating as a movie theatre and catering to college students with second-run movies. The building was demolished in 1963.

1901

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