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In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

In his two-and-a-half-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Dick Gregory (1932-2017) talks extensively about the history of racism in America, and on his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement. He recalls his groundbreaking appearances on 'Tonight Starring Jack Paar' where he was the first African-American comedian to sit on Paar’s couch. He discusses the role of Hugh Hefner in getting him into mainstream nightclubs, and how he developed his act over the years. Gregory speaks of many aspects of doing stand-up comedy, including coming up with material, techniques, and using real life experiences as fodder for his act. He covers a number of societal issues, and relates how things changed during his lifetime. Jenni Matz and Bill Dana conducted the interview on October 15, 2005 in Washington D.C. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Diversity in Television, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Television Industry, and Late Night.

2005-10-15

In his two-and-a-half-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Dick Gregory (1932-2017) talks extensively about the history of racism in America, and on his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement. He recalls his groundbreaking appearances on 'Tonight Starring Jack Paar' where he was the first African-American comedian to sit on Paar’s couch. He discusses the role of Hugh Hefner in getting him into mainstream nightclubs, and how he developed his act over the years. Gregory speaks of many aspects of doing stand-up comedy, including coming up with material, techniques, and using real life experiences as fodder for his act. He covers a number of societal issues, and relates how things changed during his lifetime. Jenni Matz and Bill Dana conducted the interview on October 15, 2005 in Washington D.C. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Diversity in Television, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Television Industry, and Late Night.

2005-10-15

In his two-and-a-half-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Dick Gregory (1932-2017) talks extensively about the history of racism in America, and on his involvement with the Civil Rights Movement. He recalls his groundbreaking appearances on 'Tonight Starring Jack Paar' where he was the first African-American comedian to sit on Paar’s couch. He discusses the role of Hugh Hefner in getting him into mainstream nightclubs, and how he developed his act over the years. Gregory speaks of many aspects of doing stand-up comedy, including coming up with material, techniques, and using real life experiences as fodder for his act. He covers a number of societal issues, and relates how things changed during his lifetime. Jenni Matz and Bill Dana conducted the interview on October 15, 2005 in Washington D.C. Additional topics covered include: Advice, Diversity in Television, Historic Events and Social Change, Minorities, Television Industry, and Late Night.

2005-10-15

In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

In his forty-five minute interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) talks about his connection to humor, and his friendships with comedians like Lenny Bruce and Don Adams. He describes having comedians on his early talk show 'Playboy’s Penthouse,' as well as breaking ground by having African-American comedian Dick Gregory perform at his clubs. He discusses the humor of "Playboy" magazine, and early contributors like Jules Feiffer. He speaks of the then-current state of censorship in media, and also touches on humor and repression, as well as fame and celebrity. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on March 9, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Civil Rights Movement, Historic Events and Social Change, Television Industry, and Talk Shows.

2005-03-09

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