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In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Jackie Mason talks about where his comedy comes from, and the process of building his act. He describes his start as a Catskill comedian, where he created his persona, and his first television appearance, on 'The Steve Allen Show.' He details the infamous incident where Ed Sullivan believed he’d held up his middle finger, resulting in him being off television for many years. Mason describes the business aspect of show business, and the role of agents and managers in his career. He recounts his career trajectory, including his resurgence in the 1980s with the Broadway show "Jackie Mason: The World According to Me." Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on April 7, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Music Shows & Variety Shows/Specials, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is the 'Ed Sullivan Show, The AKA Toast of the Town.'

2005-04-07

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Jackie Mason talks about where his comedy comes from, and the process of building his act. He describes his start as a Catskill comedian, where he created his persona, and his first television appearance, on 'The Steve Allen Show.' He details the infamous incident where Ed Sullivan believed he’d held up his middle finger, resulting in him being off television for many years. Mason describes the business aspect of show business, and the role of agents and managers in his career. He recounts his career trajectory, including his resurgence in the 1980s with the Broadway show "Jackie Mason: The World According to Me." Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on April 7, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Music Shows & Variety Shows/Specials, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is the 'Ed Sullivan Show, The AKA Toast of the Town.'

2005-04-07

In his one-hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Jackie Mason talks about where his comedy comes from, and the process of building his act. He describes his start as a Catskill comedian, where he created his persona, and his first television appearance, on 'The Steve Allen Show.' He details the infamous incident where Ed Sullivan believed he’d held up his middle finger, resulting in him being off television for many years. Mason describes the business aspect of show business, and the role of agents and managers in his career. He recounts his career trajectory, including his resurgence in the 1980s with the Broadway show "Jackie Mason: The World According to Me." Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on April 7, 2005 in New York, NY. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Music Shows & Variety Shows/Specials, and Talk Shows. An additional show mentioned during the interview is the 'Ed Sullivan Show, The AKA Toast of the Town.'

2005-04-07

In his two-and-a-half hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Chuck McCann (1934-2018) talks about his early life, and seeing many performers on stage as a child, including Danny Thomas and Abbott and Costello, due to his father being a musician. He speaks of his early television work, including 'The Rootie Kazootie Club,' 'The Sandy Becker Show,' and 'Today,' which led to him hosting his own local children’s show on WPIX in New York City. McCann recalls his friendships with many luminaries, including Jerry Lewis, Stan Laurel, Mae West, Ernie Kovacs, and Steve Allen. He discusses the power of laughter to make us heal, and the then-current state of comedy. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 13, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Comedy-Variety, and TV's Golden Age (1940s & '50s), Technological Innovation, Television Industry, Children's Programming, News and Documentary, and Talk Shows. Other shows mentioned during the interview include 'Captain Kangaroo' and 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2007-02-13

In his two-and-a-half hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Chuck McCann (1934-2018) talks about his early life, and seeing many performers on stage as a child, including Danny Thomas and Abbott and Costello, due to his father being a musician. He speaks of his early television work, including 'The Rootie Kazootie Club,' 'The Sandy Becker Show,' and 'Today,' which led to him hosting his own local children’s show on WPIX in New York City. McCann recalls his friendships with many luminaries, including Jerry Lewis, Stan Laurel, Mae West, Ernie Kovacs, and Steve Allen. He discusses the power of laughter to make us heal, and the then-current state of comedy. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 13, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Comedy-Variety, and TV's Golden Age (1940s & '50s), Technological Innovation, Television Industry, Children's Programming, News and Documentary, and Talk Shows. Other shows mentioned during the interview include 'Captain Kangaroo' and 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2007-02-13

In his two-and-a-half hour interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Chuck McCann (1934-2018) talks about his early life, and seeing many performers on stage as a child, including Danny Thomas and Abbott and Costello, due to his father being a musician. He speaks of his early television work, including 'The Rootie Kazootie Club,' 'The Sandy Becker Show,' and 'Today,' which led to him hosting his own local children’s show on WPIX in New York City. McCann recalls his friendships with many luminaries, including Jerry Lewis, Stan Laurel, Mae West, Ernie Kovacs, and Steve Allen. He discusses the power of laughter to make us heal, and the then-current state of comedy. Bill Dana and Jenni Matz conducted the interview on February 13, 2007 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Comedy-Variety, and TV's Golden Age (1940s & '50s), Technological Innovation, Television Industry, Children's Programming, News and Documentary, and Talk Shows. Other shows mentioned during the interview include 'Captain Kangaroo' and 'The Steve Allen Show' (1956-61).

2007-02-13

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part two of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives, Bill Dana (1924-2017) talks about comedians learning to deal with their environment and audiences. He describes first learning how to make people laugh, and later using comedy to disarm. He discusses evolving standards for subject matter and language in comedy, and his controversial character "Jose Jimenez" from 'The Bill Dana Show. 'Dana speaks of working with Norman Lear on writing the classic 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy’s Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and outlines his own guest shot on 'The Golden Girls.' He sums up by talking about the need for performers to pay their dues, and he answers the question, "Was it worth it?" Jenni Matz conducted part two of the interview on June 3, 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. Additional topics covered include: Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-06-03

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

In part one of his two-part interview for the American Comedy Archives at Emerson College, Bill Dana (1924-2017) discusses the use of humor as a survival tool. He talks about his time at Emerson College, and early comedy partner Gene Wood. He recalls his time on 'The Steve Allen Show,' as well as creating his most famous character, "Jose Jimenez." He details using "Jose" as the main character for 'The Bill Dana Show,' and his eventual decision to kill him off due to cultural sensitivity concerns. He recounts writing the famous 'All in the Family' episode "Sammy Visit," featuring Sammy Davis, Jr., and addresses comedy’s role in society. Jenni Matz conducted part one of the interview on February 21, 2005 at the Cutler Majestic Theater at Emerson College in Boston, MA. Additional topics covered include: Bloopers, Censorship/Standards & Practices, Fame and Celebrity, Pop Culture, Television Industry, Comedy Series, and Talk Shows.

2005-02-21

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